Corporate Bankruptcy

March 16, 2017

 

What happens when a public company files for protection under the federal bankruptcy laws? Who protects the interests of investors? Do the old securities have any value when, and if, the company is reorganized? We hope this information answers these and other frequently asked questions about the lengthy and sometimes uncertain bankruptcy process.

 

 

Federal bankruptcy laws govern how companies go out of business or recover from crippling debt. A bankrupt company, the "debtor," might use Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code to "reorganize" its business and try to become profitable again. Management continues to run the day-to-day business operations but all significant business decisions must be approved by a bankruptcy court.

 

Under Chapter 7, the company stops all operations and goes completely out of business. A trustee is appointed to "liquidate" (sell) the company's assets and the money is used to pay off the debt, which may include debts to creditors and investors.

 

The investors who take the least risk are paid first. For example, secured creditors take less risk because the credit that they extend is usually backed by collateral, such as a mortgage or other assets of the company. They know they will get paid first if the company declares bankruptcy.

 

Bondholders have a greater potential for recovering their losses than stockholders, because bonds represent the debt of the company and the company has agreed to pay bondholders interest and to return their principal. Stockholders own the company, and take greater risk. They could make more money if the company does well, but they could lose money if the company does poorly. The owners are last in line to be repaid if the company fails. Bankruptcy laws determine the order of payment.

 

Why Would a Company Choose Chapter 11?

 

Most publicly-held companies will file under Chapter 11 rather than Chapter 7 because they can still run their business and control the bankruptcy process. Chapter 11 provides a process for rehabilitating the company's faltering business. Sometimes the company successfully works out a plan to return to profitability; sometimes, in the end, it liquidates. Under a Chapter 11 reorganization, a company usually keeps doing business and its stock and bonds may continue to trade in our securities markets. Since they still trade, the company must continue to file SEC reports with information about significant developments. For example, when a company declares bankruptcy, or has other significant corporate changes, they must report it within 15 days on the SEC's Form 8-K.

 

How Does Chapter 11 Work?

The U.S. Trustee, the bankruptcy arm of the Justice Department, will appoint one or more committees to represent the interests of creditors and stockholders in working with the company to develop a plan of reorganization to get out of debt. The plan must be accepted by the creditors, bondholders, and stockholders, and confirmed by the court. However, even if creditors or stockholders vote to reject the plan, the court can disregard the vote and still confirm the plan if it finds that the plan treats creditors and stockholders fairly. Once the plan is confirmed, another more detailed report must be filed with the SEC on Form 8-K. This report must contain a summary of the plan, but sometimes a copy of the complete plan is attached.

 

Who Develops the Reorganization Plan for the Company?

Committees of creditors and stockholders negotiate a plan with the company to relieve the company from repaying part of its debt so that the company can try to get back on its feet.

  • One committee that must be formed is called the "official committee of unsecured creditors." They represent all unsecured creditors, including bondholders. The "indenture trustee," often a bank hired by the company when it originally issued a bond, may sit on the committee.

     

  • An additional official committee may sometimes be appointed to represent stockholders.

     

  • The U.S. Trustee may appoint another committee to represent a distinct class of creditors, such as secured creditors, employees or subordinated bondholders.

After the committees work with the company to develop a plan, the bankruptcy court must find that it legally complies with the Bankruptcy Code before the plan can be implemented. This process is known as plan confirmation and is usually completed in a few months.

 

Steps in Development of the Plan:
  • The debtor company develops a plan with committees.

     

  • Company prepares a disclosure statement and reorganization plan and files it with the court.

     

  • SEC reviews the disclosure statement to be sure it's complete.

     

  • Creditors (and sometimes the stockholders) vote on the plan.

     

  • Court confirms the plan, and

     

  • Company carries out the plan by distributing the securities or payments called for by the plan.

 

How Will I Know What's Going On?

 

You may be asked to vote on the plan of reorganization, although you may not get the full value of your claim back. In fact, sometimes unsecured creditors don't get anything back. Before you vote, you should receive from the company:

  • a copy of the reorganization plan or a summary;

     

  • a court approved disclosure statement which includes information to help you make an informed judgment about the plan;

     

  • a ballot to vote on the plan; and

     

  • notice of the date, if any, for a hearing on the court's confirmation of the plan, including the deadline for filing objections.

 

What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

Some companies are so far in debt or have other problems so serious that they can't continue their business operations. They are likely to "liquidate" and file under Chapter 7. Their assets are sold for cash by a court appointed trustee. Administrative and legal expenses are paid first, and the remainder goes to creditors. Secured creditors will have their collateral returned to them. If the value of the collateral is not sufficient to repay them in full, they will be grouped with other unsecured creditors for the rest of their claim. Bondholders, and other unsecured creditors, will be notified of the Chapter 7, and should file a claim in case there's money left for them to receive a payment.

 

 

Does My Claim or Bond Have Any Value?

Usually, the stock of a Chapter 7 company is worthless and you have lost the money you invested.

If you hold a bond or trade claim, you might only receive a fraction of its face value. It will depend on the amount of assets available for distribution and where your debt ranks in the priority list on the first page. If your bond is secured by collateral, your payment will depend in large part on the value of the collateral.

 

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